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How to Attract Beneficial Insects?

Why Should I Want to Attract Insects to My Garden? Some may inquire as to why anybody would need to draw in any bugs to their garden. All things considered, the truth of the matter is that creepy crawlies are totally fundamental for two great reasons:

To begin with, bugs are required for good fertilization. Wind can fertilize, and raisers can seclude certain plants and fertilize with little paint brushes; be that as it may, plant specialists require creepy crawlies for good fertilization.

Second, creepy crawlies keep up nature’s adjust in the garden. Basically, helpful bugs eat or murder plant obliterating creepy crawlies. Also, given a nourishment source, plant devastating creepy crawlies will appear.

For all garden plants, the perfect soil has a decent blend of sand, residue, and earth particles. The geometry of the sand parts gives spaces to water retention and seepage, while the dirt and sediment segments hold some dampness which is vital for both your plants and for the natural segments of your dirt.

How to Attract Beneficial Insects (Three Do’s and One Don’t)

  1. Provide early flowering plants. Consider planting an insectary near or within the garden to attract beneficial insects. Cluster flowering plants, like yarrow, dill, fennel, and wild carrots are particularly good at attracting parasitic wasps. Composite flowers, like zinnias and sunflowers will attract robber flies and predatory wasps. Low growing herbs, like thyme and oregano give ground beetles cover for hiding. And, praying mantises like to hide in plants as well. Your goal should be to always have something in bloom. And, relatively large blocks of one color flower can be very attractive to bees.
  2. You can also provide housing for mason bees by drilling holes into wood near the garden, by placing a bunch of drinking straws in a coffee can and mounting it horizontally in some protected area, or you can purchase inexpensive mason bee houses.
  3. Provide water, especially during dry spells. Beneficials, like all insects, need water and will fly to other sources if you don’t provide some. Simply add a few saucers of water, perhaps protected by a decorative cluster of rocks. Of course, large pools of stagnant water can also provide a breeding haven for mosquitoes, so don’t overdo it.
  4. Don’t use non-selective insecticides to kill the bad bugs, or you’ll kill the good bugs as well. If you observe a large infestation of bad bugs and virtually no beneficial insects, you may want to carefully use a non-chemical product like Bull’s-Eye™ Bioinsecticide from Gardens Alive!® to control the plant damaging insects. According to the manufacturer, Bull’s Eye will not significantly harm most beneficial insects.

Some of the More Popular Beneficial Insects

Ladybugs

Known as ladybirds in the UK, Australia and New Zealand, scientists prefer to call them ladybird beetles or lady beetles, as these are not “true bugs.” True bugs are identified as those that have particular mouth parts that enable them to puncture tissue and suck fluid … aphids, for example, are true bugs. Lady beetles are voracious eaters of aphids, scale insects, mealybugs, and mites. They can be yellow, orange, or red, with black dots, and they’re particularly attracted to early pollen sources, like mustard, coriander, buckwheat, coreopsis, dandelions, and scented geraniums.

Asian Ladybeetles (Japanese Ladybugs)

Considered by many as a nuisance, because they like to move inside over the winter, Asian ladybeetles leave a stain and an unpleasant odor when frightened or squashed. They have been known to bite humans, and are more aggressive that the more lovable lady beetle. But, by definition, they are true beneficial insects. Asian Ladybeetles can be identified by a distinctive dark W or M on their heads.

Praying Mantis or Preying Mantis

The famous Praying Mantis – after whom our most famous product was named (for its shape, not its behavior) – will only eat meat that it has captured itself. True carnivores, they are completely harmless to plants. They have a voracious appetite, especially the young newly hatched nymphs. They’ll eat ahpids, but will also eat anything, including beneficial insects, siblings, and even their own mates. It was once rumored to be illegal to kill a praying mantis; that’s not true; but, it’s not a good thing either. Soldier Beetle Also known as leatherwings because of their soft, cloth like wing covers, soldier beetles are very beneficial because they eat damaging insects (including caterpillers, insect eggs, aphids, and other soft bodied insects) without attacking plant foliage. They are soft bodied insects that resemble lightning bugs.

Green Lacewings

While adult lacewings don’t kill pest insects, their offspring will. Lacewings eat nectar and lay their eggs on plant foliage; the emerging larva are voracious aphid eaters, capable of consuming over 200 pests or pest eggs per week! Beneficial or Bad Bug? If you’re not sure what king of “bug” you have, take some time to observe what’s going in its environment. If you have significant plant damage, you’re likely to have harmful insects. If not, you may be blessed with a “beneficial insect” that is working to consume the bad bugs in your garden.